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It is quite cozy in the studio, but dark and dreary outside, at one point it was sleeting! We ladled hot carrot-ginger soup into two bowls, then added plops of sour cream and handfuls of chopped scallions. It was the very lunch for a day like today. To fill out the meal we added turkey sandwiches, which one of us ate with gusto and the other nibbled around the edges, it was the very last of the Thanksgiving turkey. Enough turkey already, the finicky one said. Remember to cook something delicious for yourselves, dear friends.

Still enjoying leftover turkey sandwiches for lunch—Turkey Tuesday. We’ll keep it going as long as we can.

Short grain rice and orzo cooked with black beans seasoned with oregano, and pan-fried sweet Italian sausages with fennel for lunch today. We are still shoveling out, sloshing through icy puddles, and sliding around on the roads—the aftermath of yesterday’s unexpected and unseasonal snowfall. Get cozy with a good book, or watch movies, or take a long walk this weekend and, of course, remember to cook something delicious for yourselves, dear friends.

While the baby beets and stubby carrots roasted in the oven this morning, we had dainty bowls of chili with plops of sour cream for elevenses. For lunch, we tossed the roasted root vegetables with bitter radicchio leaves in a lemony, cumin and smoked paprika vinaigrette. This salad definitely put the roses in our cheeks.

While the baby beets and stubby carrots roasted in the oven this morning, we had dainty bowls of chili with plops of sour cream for elevenses. For lunch, we tossed the roasted root vegetables with bitter radicchio leaves in a lemony, cumin and smoked paprika vinaigrette. That salad definitely put the roses in our cheeks.

Today our conversations about food officially turned Thanksgiving centric: “Have you ordered your birds yet?”; “How many pounds?”; “How many people will you be cooking for?”; “Are you making stuffing?”; “Which one?”; “What side dishes will you make this year?”; “Which pies?”; “Is anyone bringing anything?”; “Are you trying anything new this year?”. We will both use russet potatoes to make mounds of silky, smooth whipped mashed potatoes. And probably both serve a pile of buttery string beans. The rest of our menus will fall into place as the week progresses. A guest joined us today just as we were sitting down to lunch on baked potatoes with melted butter and sour cream, with a pile of buttery string beans. It’s beginning to taste a lot like Thanksgiving.

It’s always a treat to come into the studio on Mondays and find out/talk about what each of us cooked up at home over the weekend. It’s even better when delicious leftovers come along, too. So for lunch today, we turned CH’s maitake mushroom risotto into risotto cakes (we added an egg to the risotto to bind the cakes), breaded them with crunchy, buttery bread crumbs, then baked them in a 400°F oven until hot. MH brought washed Bibb lettuce and we tossed it in our Canal House Vinaigrette. Leftovers never tasted so good.

We arrived at the studio with a butternut squash. Hmm, what could we make with it for lunch? Then we eyed a box of artisanal tagliatelle in our pantry, and the decision was made. We braised fat cubes of squash and sliced garlic with butter, preserved lemon, and saffron and spooned the chunky “sauce” around tangles of toothsome pasta. Just as we sat down to eat, it started—the cold rains of November. With a few more days like this, all the leaves will be off the trees. We’re definitely heading into pasta season. Cook something delicious for yourselves this weekend, dear friends.

On her way home from a meeting in NYC yesterday, MH stopped at our favorite Korean spot—So Kong Dong in Fort Lee, N.J.—for a bowl of boiling-hot soondubu jjigae (spicy soft tofu stew). Halfway through eating, she ordered more to take-away for lunch the next day. So today that’s just what we did, heated up the stew and slurped down every last tasty drop. CH was grateful for such a thoughtful gift. And we both agreed that it’s a good thing we don’t have more delicious spots like this nearby—we’d never cook!

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